Archive for the ‘Puzzle’ Category:

TomTom by Thomas Snyder

TomTom by Thomas Snyder

PDF

or solve online (using our beta test of Penpa-Edit tools)

Theme: Even Steven

Author/Opus: This is the 416th puzzle from Thomas Snyder, aka Dr. Sudoku.

Rules: Standard TomTom rules, using the integers 1-6.

Difficulty: 2 stars

Time Standards (highlight to view): Grandmaster = 1:30, Master = 2:00, Expert = 4:00

Solution: To be posted tomorrow on this post once live.

Note: Follow this link for classic TomTom and this link for TomTom variations. If you are new to this puzzle type, here are our easiest TomTom to get started on. More TomTom puzzles can be found in the TomTom collection, in The Art of Puzzles, and in our beginner-friendly collection Intro to GMPuzzles by Serkan Yürekli.

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Yesterday’s Solution: “S” Aqre by Eric Fox: PDF and solving video.

Aqre by Eric Fox

Aqre by Eric Fox

PDF

or solve online (using our beta test of Penpa-Edit tools; use tab to shift between shading mode and the composite Yajilin mode where left click marks cells, right click marks dots in cells or X’s on edges, left click+drag draws lines.)

Theme: S

Author/Opus: This is the 9th puzzle from guest contributor Eric Fox.

Rules: Standard Aqre rules: Shade some cells so that all shaded cells form one connected group. Regions with numbers must contain the indicated count of shaded cells, and it is allowed to shade over the numbered cells. There may not exist a run of four or more consecutive shaded or unshaded cells horizontally or vertically anywhere in the grid. (Note: with this puzzle, we have updated our default formatting for Aqre to use smaller digits to not interfere as much with solver notation that may be used in those squares. The fundamental rules of the puzzle are unchanged.)

See also this example:

Aqre Example by Serkan Yürekli

Difficulty: 1.5 stars

Time Standards (highlight to view): Grandmaster = 1:00, Master = 1:45, Expert = 3:30

Solution: To be posted tomorrow on this post once live.

Note: Follow this link for more Aqre puzzles. If you are new to this puzzle type, here are our easiest Aqre to get started on. More Aqre puzzles are in Shading Variety Collection by Prasanna Seshadri.

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Yesterday’s Solution: “Diagonals” Masyu by Tom Collyer: PDF and solving video.

Masyu by Tom Collyer

Masyu by Tom Collyer

PDF

or solve online (using our beta test of Penpa-Edit tools in linex mode where left click+drag draws lines and right click marks X’s)

Author/Opus: This is the 49th puzzle from our contributing puzzlemaster Tom Collyer.

Rules: Standard Masyu rules.

Difficulty: 1 star

Time Standards (highlight to view): Grandmaster = 0:35, Master = 1:00, Expert = 2:00

Solution: To be posted tomorrow on this post once live.

Note: Follow this link for classic Masyu and this link for Masyu variations. If you are new to this puzzle type, here are our easiest Masyu to get started on. More Masyu puzzles can be found in The Art of Puzzles and in our beginner-friendly book Logic Puzzles 101.

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Yesterday’s Solution: “Yamato” Japanese Sums (Battleships) by John Bulten: PDF and solving video.

Sunday Stumper: Japanese Sums (Battleships) by John Bulten

Since 2021, we have posted some extra difficult Sunday Stumpers, about once a month. These will be quite tough puzzles, but with a logical path to be found (and solution videos to help). This seventh Sunday Stumper of 2022 is a variation of Japanese Sums by John Bulten.

Japanese Sums (Battleships) by John Bulten

PDF

or solve online (using our beta test of Penpa-Edit tools; use tab to shift between number entry and shading modes.)

Theme: Yamato

Author/Opus: This is the 88th puzzle from our contributing puzzlemaster John Bulten.

Rules: Standard Japanese Sums rules: Place the numbers in the indicated range (1-9) in some of the cells so that no number is repeated in any row or column. Numbers on the outside of the grid indicate the sums of adjacent number groups in that row or column, in order. Each sum is separated by at least one unused cell. A ? can represent any sum of 1 or larger.

Also, all unused cells must form an unknown fleet of 1-cell wide ships in the grid. Each segment of a ship occupies a single cell, and ships do not touch each other, even diagonally.

Japanese Sums Example

Difficulty: 5 stars

Time Standards (highlight to view): Grandmaster = 18:30, Master = 30:00, Expert = 1:00:00

Solution: To be posted tomorrow on this post once live.

Note: Follow this link for other Japanese Sums puzzles.

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Saturday’s Solution: “Why was 6 Afraid of 7?” Japanese Sums by Sam Cappleman-Lynes: PDF and solving video.

Japanese Sums by Sam Cappleman-Lynes

Japanese Sums by Sam Cappleman-Lynes

PDF

or solve online (using our beta test of Penpa-Edit tools; use tab to shift between number entry and shading modes.)

Theme: Why was 6 Afraid of 7?

Author/Opus: This is the 10th puzzle from guest contributor Sam Cappleman-Lynes.

Rules: Place the numbers in the indicated range (1-8) in some of the cells so that no number is repeated in any row or column. Numbers on the outside of the grid indicate the sums of adjacent number groups in that row or column, in order. Each sum is separated by at least one unused cell. A ? can represent any sum of 1 or larger.

Japanese Sums Example

Difficulty: 4.5 stars

Time Standards (highlight to view): Grandmaster = 12:00, Master = 20:00, Expert = 40:00

Solution: To be posted tomorrow on this post once live.

Note: Follow this link for other Japanese Sums puzzles.

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Saturday’s Solution: “Twenty20 Vision” Japanese Sums by Prasanna Seshadri: PDF and solving video.

Japanese Sums by Prasanna Seshadri

Japanese Sums by Prasanna Seshadri

PDF

or solve online (using our beta test of Penpa-Edit tools; use tab to shift between number entry and shading modes.)

Theme: Twenty20 Vision

Author/Opus: This is the 238th puzzle from our contributing puzzlemaster Prasanna Seshadri.

Rules: Place the numbers in the indicated range (1-9) in some of the cells so that no number is repeated in any row or column. Numbers on the outside of the grid indicate the sums of adjacent number groups in that row or column, in order. Each sum is separated by at least one unused cell. The adjacent question marks (??) show two-digit numbers, not two groups)

Japanese Sums Example

Difficulty: 3.5 stars

Time Standards (highlight to view): Grandmaster = 6:00, Master = 9:15, Expert = 18:30

Solution: To be posted tomorrow on this post once live.

Note: Follow this link for other Japanese Sums puzzles.

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Saturday’s Solution: “Doubles” Japanese Sums by Ashish Kumar: PDF and solving video.

Japanese Sums by Ashish Kumar

Japanese Sums by Ashish Kumar

PDF

or solve online (using our beta test of Penpa-Edit tools; use tab to shift between number entry and shading modes.)

Theme: Doubles

Author/Opus: This is the 96th puzzle from our contributing puzzlemaster Ashish Kumar.

Rules: Place the numbers in the indicated range (1-6) in some of the cells so that no number is repeated in any row or column. Numbers on the outside of the grid indicate the sums of adjacent number groups in that row or column, in order. Each sum is separated by at least one unused cell.

Japanese Sums Example

Difficulty: 3.5 stars

Time Standards (highlight to view): Grandmaster = 4:30, Master = 8:15, Expert = 16:30

Solution: To be posted tomorrow on this post once live.

Note: Follow this link for other Japanese Sums puzzles.

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Saturday’s Solution: “Common Denominations” Japanese Sums by Thomas Snyder: PDF and solving video.